dancindonna.info Theory DARK HERESY SECOND EDITION FORGOTTEN GODS PDF

DARK HERESY SECOND EDITION FORGOTTEN GODS PDF

Saturday, November 16, 2019 admin Comments(0)

Announcing the First Supplement for Dark Heresy Second Edition Forgotten Gods, the first book-length adventure for Dark Heresy Second. Right, so with Forgotten Gods having been relesed for a while now, and Dark Heresy already has a lot of fantastic pre-generated campaigns. Dark Heresy Second Edition: Forgotten Gods - Take your investigations to entirely new worlds in Hesinde-Vademecum (PDF) als Download.


Author:KATELYN TATTERSHALL
Language:English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country:Burundi
Genre:Fiction & Literature
Pages:350
Published (Last):10.06.2015
ISBN:612-1-17192-745-4
ePub File Size:24.48 MB
PDF File Size:16.86 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Downloads:29522
Uploaded by: TAMMI

Dark Heresy Second Edition: Forgotten Gods - Take your investigations to entirely new worlds in Forgotten Gods, a supplement for Dark Heresy Second Edition! Mankin. Watermarked PDF. $ $ 1 2 3 4 5. DH 2e - Forgotten dancindonna.info M. Bookmark Dark Dark Heresy Second Edition - Enemies dancindonna.info M. Bookmark. This edition published Core Rulebook and the dark Heresy game master's kit; the latter also In this second chapter of Forgotten gods, the Acolytes find.

Original electronic Scanned image These products were created by scanning an original printed edition. Most older books are in scanned image format because original digital layout files never existed or were no longer available from the publisher. The result of this OCR process is placed invisibly behind the picture of each scanned page, to allow for text searching. However, any text in a given book set on a graphical background or in handwritten fonts would most likely not be picked up by the OCR software, and is therefore not searchable. Also, a few larger books may be resampled to fit into the system, and may not have this searchable text background.

Second edition forgotten dark gods pdf heresy

Your investigation begins in the wastelands outside of Hive Desoleum. In this bleak landscape and in the hive itself, you uncover the seeds of corruption that will lead you closer to your final goal.

Your adventure starts at the scene of a violent altercation, and from that point, you must track down those responsible and discover the whereabouts of the xenos artefacts that the smugglers were hoping to sell.

Canberra Dark Heresy VSS

The trail of the crime quickly leads you offworld, onto the massive Rogue Trader vessel, Oath Unspoken. Aboard the Oath Unspoken , your investigations can continue, but the ship is as large as a city, and finding clear answers anywhere may quickly lead you and your fellow Acolytes into unwanted trouble.

You may descend into the depths of the ship to investigate the Corpse-Holds, or you may be summoned to the Banquet Chamber of Lord-Captain Astride Anzaforr. After the voyage, you arrive at the bone-ridden cemetery world of Thaur. The planet is covered in tombs to honor the dead and overgrown, primeval forests. Despite this outward tranquility, heresy of the darkest sort festers within the planet. It will take every effort from you and the other Acolytes to exterminate this heresy and vanquish the heretics for the glory of the Emperor.

In addition to a thrilling adventure that spans the Askellon sector, Forgotten Gods offers plenty of gazetteer information on the locations of the adventure. What's more, each of these three main locations can be used as a new homeworld during character creation. Your Acolyte may hail from the packed city of Hive Desoleum, he may have been born aboard the Oath Unspoken , or he may call the shrine world of Thaur his former home.

Heresy is everywhere in the Imperium. You are one of the few tasked with battling that heresy. Now, in Forgotten Gods , you face a threat like no other. Gather your courage and pray to the Emperor for strength. Only you can stop the deadly threat now stirring in the Askellon sector! Dark Heresy Second Edition is a roleplaying game of danger, mystery, and brutal violence set in the decaying far future of Warhammer 40, Players take on the role of defenders of humanity and embark on hazardous adventures into the dark heart of the 41st Millennium.

As an Acolyte of an Inquisitor, you'll serve at the front line of a great and secret war to root out dangers that imperil all of humanity. Forgotten Gods, the first book-length adventure for Dark Heresy Second Edition, is now available at your local retailer and online through our webstore! A Widespread ConspiracyThis adventure thrusts you into the midst of an investigation into the Faceless Trade -- smugglers trafficking proscribed artefacts. In this bleak lands This adventure thrusts you into the midst of an investigation into the Faceless Trade — smugglers trafficking proscribed artefacts.

In Dark Heresy Second Edition , you are an Acolyte in the service of the Inquisition, battling unfathomable evils as you struggle to keep the Imperium from utter corruption. Threats may arise from within, without, or beyond And sometimes, the greatest threats come from the distant past. We recently announced the Forgotten Gods book-length adventure, which pits you and your team of Acolytes against the Faceless Trade, smugglers of proscribed artefacts, whose wares may awaken an ancient evil.

Your investigations will take you across the Askellon sector, through strange and unknown locales. Today, Tim Cox, the writer of the Forgotten Gods adventure, shares his thoughts on designing the key locations of the book.

After writing Dark Pursuits , the adventure contained in the Dark Heresy Second Edition Core Rulebook , I was more than a little excited to dive into Forgotten Gods , the first book-length adventure for the new edition! Like Dark Pursuits and Desolation of the Dead , the adventure included in the Dark Heresy Game Master's Kit , Forgotten Gods explores the central themes of Dark Heresy , as the Acolytes explore hidden threats and expose even greater dangers to the Askellon sector, striving against overwhelming odds to stem the rise of darkness.

This time, the investigation of the xenos artefacts takes the Players Characters from the depths of the hive to the wastelands surrounding it, before leading them off-planet entirely. Players may have learned a great deal about the hive city of Desoleum in prior Dark Heresy adventures, but I'm really excited for them to see more of the strange locations and cultures in the Askellon sector.

Over the course of this adventure, they'll visit two radically different locations - the Rogue Trader vessel, Oath Unspoken , and the shrine world of Thaur, a blessed planet devoted to cemeteries. I had a lot of fun developing both locations and coming up with unique details to set them apart. Each location has a truly distinct atmosphere that brings these places to life. Here, you'll find a gazetteer with information about the shipboard culture and notable locations aboard the Oath Unspoken , from the Corpse-Holds to the Navigator's Sanctum, but you'll also discover more of the Rogue Traders' role in the Askellon sector.

Specifically, readers will learn of the great trade war between the Anzaforr and Surena dynasties, and how the two families have undertaken penance in the decades since. Of course, any benefits to their power bases as a result of services offered to the Ecclesiarchy or the Imperial Navy are surely incidental!

One ship area the PCs will likely visit is the Drunnels, a large open-deck marketplace that takes up an entire cargo hold and a large portion of the surrounding corridors and chambers. The Drunnels showcases the fact that the Oath Unspoken is much more than a mere ship, and its peculiar customs have developed over thousands of years. Aboard a Rogue Trader's vessel, it is perhaps no surprise that the importance of trade and negotiation has filtered down to even the lowliest crew-serfs.

In the Drunnels, haggling is a way of life.

40k RPG FFG News | 40k RPG Tools

An elaborately ritualised form of negotiating is required for any transaction, from acquiring information or lodgings to merely catching a glimpse of a performance by the Cirque Commercia. Unwary Acolytes might even find themselves entering into unintended bargains! After travelling aboard an ancient voidship, the arrival on Thaur could be a shock for the Acolytes. The PCs were unlikely to see even a single leaf on Desoleum, but now the steel corridors of hive and voidship are now replaced by vast, dense forests and ancient, crumbling mausoleums.

This sparsely populated, largely low-tech world offers a distinct contrast to Hive Desoleum and the Oath Unspoken! Thaur is home to the graves of the sector's greatest heroes and most revered saints, with monuments and tombs built from the bones of pious citizens. On this planet the dead are more important than the living. Every division of the Eulogus Askelline - the planet's governing body and Ecclesiarchy diocese - is committed to the task of caring for and honouring the deceased, from the poor who scrimp and save their entire lives to be buried here, to powerful nobility, war heroes, and saints.

I really enjoyed coming up with the details of the Eulogus Askelline's beliefs and various branches, as it incorporates Thaur's governance, religion, defence force, and more.

In particular, I'm quite fond of the Ossuarian Custodians, the monastic guardians of the Great Ossuria and the ancient and mysterious catacombs that descend far beneath Thaur's surface. From defending against tomb robbers to repairing crumbling bone-work statues, they see to the preservation of the ossuaries that house Thaur's most esteemed residents.

Unlike the Mournful Guard who watch over the surface, the Custodians carry specialised and deadly weaponry - and they do not look kindly upon intruders. I hope players enjoy exploring the Askellon sector further in Forgotten God s as they uncover and defeat an ancient threat to the Imperium.

For me, one of the best parts of Warhammer 40, is the interesting and bizarre worlds that make up the Imperium. Even within the world classifications - hive world, forge world, shrine world, and so on - there's no standard, and Dark Heresy offers the opportunity to explore this diversity in depth. I think players and GMs will find the wastelands of Desoleum, the Oath Unspoken , and Thaur to offer many exciting roleplaying opportunities, whether you sit down to a formal dinner with Lord-Captain Aristide Anzaforr or push through the tangled forests of Thaur to search for the grave of a god.

But remember - wherever you go, there are always new heresies! Can you stop the Faceless Trade before their artefacts awaken unspeakable corruption within the Askellon sector? Unless you act, an ancient evil will rise to prominence once more.

Gather your fellow Acolytes, and purge this heresy before it can spread! In Dark Heresy Second Edition, you are an Acolyte in the service of the Inquisition, battling unfathomable evils as you struggle to keep the Imperium from utter corruption. Threats may arise from within, without, or beyond… And sometimes, the greatest threats come from the distant past.

Like Dark Pursuits and Desol The journey through the Warp is much more than a path from point A to point B, however. Any passage through the nightmarish unreality of the Immaterium is a great undertaking, and even a relatively short Warp journey is a matter of weeks.

One entire chapter of the adventure takes place aboard the Oath Unspoken , as the PCs continue their investigation into the artefact smugglers and the identities of their mysterious customers.

Like any voidship, the Oath Unspoken is massive, much more akin to a location than a vehicle, a home to millennia of culture and secrets.

Unlike the Mournful Guard who watch over the surface, the Custodians carry specialised and deadly weaponry — and they do not look kindly upon intruders. But remember — wherever you go, there are always new heresies! Few knew of her, but those who did ensured she always had work.

She had been Faceless many times before, smuggling Eldar trinkets, silver devices of unknown origin, and even fresh Ork teef from battles along the Stygies Cluster.

The Faceless Valatine Lewin was good. The Faceless Trade never ended; the voracious appetite for the outre and forbidden meant that there would always be people like her to whet it.

Even a moment of heresy left unchecked can damn millions of lives in the terrifying future of Dark Heresy Second Edition. You must strive to forestall this grisly fate by serving as an Acolyte of an Inquisitor, the last bastion between Mankind and the eternal corruption of Chaos.

In this book-length adventure, your talents and skills are put to their greatest test, as you investigate proscribed artefacts of deadly power and battle a cult whose heresies reach far into the Askellon sector's past. Mankind was not always such a powerful force in the galaxy. Long before the first humans achieved consciousness, ancient gods ruled the stars and spaces between them.

In Forgotten Gods , your fears are about to be realised. A cult has hired the smugglers of the Faceless Trade to bring them forbidden artefacts, and they plot to use the power of these artefacts to reawaken a god from the time before Man. As a devoted servant of the Emperor, you cannot allow this heresy to occur. Your adventure begins as you track down the smugglers of the Faceless Trade on the hive planet of Desoleum. You must investigate the scene of a vicious altercation, before following the trail of the smugglers and the artefacts.

From the packed slums of the hive city, your journey takes you across the galaxy, from trekking through the Desoleum's wastelands, to dining with a Rogue Trader aboard his ship, to walking the foreboding and bone-strewn cemetery world of Thaur. Your investigations may span the Askellon sector, but your purpose remains the same: For more on the adventure and the other features you'll find within Forgotten Gods , we turn to developer Tim Huckelbery.

Forgotten Gods is our first book-length adventure for Dark Heresy Second Edition , and we're happy to show off more of the Askellon Sector in it! In this adventure, Acolytes travel the wastelands surrounding Hive Desoleum, voyage aboard a Rogue Trader vessel, and explore the foreboding shrine world of Thaur.

This adventure continues the storyline begun in the Dark Heresy Core Rulebook, where the Dark Pursuits adventure started your investigations into the dangerous xenos artefacts that pollute Hive Desoleum.

These artefacts are undoubtedly linked to countless horrible deaths, and several different groups battle to control them for profit, worship, or worse. Your investigations into the smuggling of these proscribed items continued in the events of Desolation of the Dead , the adventure included in the Dark Heresy Game Master's Kit.

Within the Forgotten Gods adventure, the Acolytes seek to end the smuggling of the so-called Faceless Trade in heretical relics before a deadly cult uses the alien items to reawaken long-dead gods that ruled the Askellon sector before Mankind was sentient.

Along the way, you may run into several familiar faces from your earlier adventures - some of whom are not at all pleased to see you again. Players who've already enjoyed the Dark Pursuits or Desolation of the Dead adventures before playing Forgotten Gods can develop their existing relationships, but Forgotten Gods can be played without having already experienced the two previous adventures.

Gods pdf edition forgotten heresy second dark

Overall, this trilogy of adventures makes for a grand mix of fast-paced chases, explosive shootouts, and dangerous explorations that puts your Acolyte's mettle to its greatest test yet. Each of the locations explored within the book has plenty of background information included, so a Game Master can extend the adventure to explore even more of the setting, or bring the Acolytes back for new investigations after the events of Forgotten Gods have concluded.

Every location, whether a Rogue Trader ship or the shrine world of Thaur, includes adventure seeds for side investigations and opportunities to seek out and combat the countless threats and unknown evils that lurk just out of sight.

There are always more heresies to be found! Forgotten Gods also offers new options for Acolyte creation. Each of the three major locations explored in this book includes rules for using that location as an Acolyte's home world, so new players can craft characters hailing from these vastly different parts of the Imperium. Alternatively - Emperor forbid - a player can use this information to create a new Acolyte should his existing character not survive their climatic adventures in Forgotten Gods!

A new adventure awaits within the pages of Forgotten Gods. You and your fellow Acolytes must journey across the Askellon sector, exploring new locales and facing terrifying odds.

If you hope to vanquish future heresies, you must face the darkness that lurks in the past. Look for Forgotten Gods at your local retailer in the fourth quarter of ! In this book-length adventure, your talents and skills are put to their greatest test, as you investigate proscribed artefacts of deadly power and battle a cult whose heresies reach far into the Askell Along the way, you may run into several familiar faces from your earlier adventures — some of whom are not at all pleased to see you again.

Alternatively — Emperor forbid — a player can use this information to create a new Acolyte should his existing character not survive their climatic adventures in Forgotten Gods! Recently, we released Dark Heresy Second Edition , a new roleplaying game that casts players as Acolytes in the service of an Inquisitor amidst the grim darkness of the far future. In every game, you face the horrors of the Warp-stained Askellon sector, striving to download humanity more time.

Although this sector is new, it is still subtly linked to the regions of the Imperium that you may have experienced before. Players steeped in the lore of the Calixis Sector and its connected regions may recall scattered mentions of some other locations - the Scelus and Ixaniad Sectors, the "Dread" Madrigal Sector, and an unnamed region bluntly labelled "Access Denied.

The Askellon sector has been marked "off limits" even by the great Navigator Houses. Ravenous data-phages slowly work their way through Imperial archives, redacting the region from stellar maps. The reason for this is simple--a seemingly endless Warp Storm, called the Pandaemonium, roars through the Askellon sector. This tempest exists on a huge scale that may one day even rival the Maelstrom and the Eye of Terror. Because of this, the Askellon sector is doomed, but not to a swift, glorious, or merciful death.

The region and its people have courted damnation since the very earliest days of human settlement in this sector. Countless legends describe the earliest days of Askellon, but few can be trusted. Some stories claim that the colonists of the first worlds were damned before they arrived; others say the settlers were helplessly fleeing some great calamity or betrayal. These first core worlds clung together through the terrors of the Age of Strife, so that when the Great Crusade finally cast out the shadows of Old Night, Askellon stood as one.

Tales from those days exist only as mythical legend and consecrated texts, describing the arrival of the Emperor and the galactic war of rebellion in sacred verses. There are manifold tales of glorious conflict and celebration from those dark times, though apocryphal whispers dare to question these events and Askellon's role in them.

Of course, such accusations are not uttered openly, for the Lords of Askellon are all-powerful within their domains, and a formidable history is not a matter for open discussion.

Askellon is steeped in damnation, forming a microcosm of the larger Imperium's fate. The institutions of the Askellon sector are crumbling, its ruling classes are beyond corrupt, its worlds are riven with endless war, and all the while, the enemies of Mankind plot its downfall.

Uncounted border systems have been lost to the Pandaemonium and other threats over the millennia, and the Imperium may perhaps turn its back on Askellon once and for all. Many of Mankind's great pillars regard the sector as lost already, so when a high adept of the Adeptus Terra passes away, none replace him.

Worst of all, the League of Black Ships has been erratic at best when scouring the sector for psykers. All of Askellon seethes with Warp energies that threaten to draw the questing coils of the Pandaemonium onwards. Upon these cursed stars falls the inscrutable eye of the Inquisition. Few Inquisitors operate openly in Askellon: An uneasy truce holds rival Inquisitors at a distance, but their wars grind on, fought by proxy through their Acolytes, even as they struggle to uncover a fraction of the crimes attributed to the Lords of Askellon.

Those sworn to an Inquisitor's service have their duties to perform, even as the sector crumbles around them. There are those who would abandon Askellon and its masters to their fate, allowing them to be consumed by the ravening Warp.

But others fear that this course of action would allow a daemonic incursion of unprecedented scale. If this invasion occurred, the worlds of an entire sector would be transformed into the domains of Daemons, and the fall of the Imperium brought even closer.

Only the bold servants of the Inquisition are willing to lay down their lives to avert this dire fate, even as the Lords of Askellon invent new sins in a sector seething with the darkest heresies known to Mankind. The doom of the Askellon sector may be certain, but there are still those of the Inquisition who will fight to the death before they see more of the Imperium slip into eternal night. Take your place among that heroic number as you make your investigations and battle for the fate of the Askellon sector!

Dark Heresy Second Edition is now available online through our webstore and at your local retailer.

40k RPG FFG News

Apocrypha AskelliosRecently, we released Dark Heresy Second Edition, a new roleplaying game that casts players as Acolytes in the service of an Inquisitor amidst the grim darkness of the far future. Although this sector is new, it is still subtly linked to the regions of the Imperium that you The reason for this is simple—a seemingly endless Warp Storm, called the Pandaemonium, roars through the Askellon sector.

Do not disappoint the saviour of all humanity. Take on the mantle of an Acolyte and enter the darkness of the far future! Enter the Askellon Sector In Dark Heresy Second Edition , you and your friends play Acolytes in the service of an Inquisitor, bound to travel the galaxy and eradicate heresy wherever you find it. Countless dangers threaten the Imperium from every side, and as servants of the Inquisition, you are Mankind's last line of defense.

Failure to confront the evils that await you could mean damnation and destruction for the entire sector. With the tools provided in this page, full-colour rulebook, you'll travel for the first time to the Askellon sector. Here, the corrupting influence of Chaos is strongly felt, and you must battle new threats from within, without, and beyond. Whether you exterminate cults, hunt down marauding xenos, or do battle with Daemonic spawn of the Warp, you'll find the starting point for all your adventures in the Dark Heresy Second Edition core rulebook.

Your journeys may take you to the decaying hive world of Desoleum, the cemetery shrine world of Thaur, or the lawless asteroids of Port Aquila. Your adventure may begin with the Dark Pursuits adventure, included in the core rulebook. In this adventure, you must trail smugglers moving deadly xenos artefacts in and out of Hive Desoleum. Whether you start with this adventure or invent your own investigations in another part of the Askellon sector, your guiding principle remains the same: This kit includes a GM screen that brings dozens of commonly used stats and rules to your fingertips.

In this kit, GMs also find everything they need to create memorable Nemeses for players to battle through overarching storylines that can span entire campaigns. There, you must uncover the secret of a xenos relic found at the center of a horrific mass murder, and stop a cult from summoning a Daemon and unleashing hordes of reanimated corpses upon the hive's inhabitants.

This adventure offers another thrilling chapter to your investigations in the Askellon sector. Battle Against Heresy The countless heresies of the 41st millennium lie before you. You and your friends are all that stands between humanity and utter destruction. Create your Acolytes and enter the grim darkness of the far future to vanquish heresy wherever it lurks. Enter the Askellon SectorIn Dark Heresy Second Edition, you and your friends play Acolytes in the service of an Inquisitor, bound to travel the galaxy and eradicate heresy wherever you find it.

Whether you exterminate cults, hunt down marauding xenos, or do battle with Daemonic spawn In Dark Heresy Second Edition , you and your friends play Acolytes in the service of an Inquisitor, bound to travel the galaxy and eradicate heresy wherever you find it.

The countless heresies of the 41st millennium lie before you. I know for a fact there is a whole lot more even farther down Millions of planets fill the galaxy in Warhammer 40, , and no two are exactly the same. Hive worlds, forge worlds, feral worlds, and death worlds are vastly different from each other, and even within these categories, planets differ massively. In Dark Heresy Second Edition , you and your fellow Acolytes journey to countless unique planets across the Askellon sector, including Hive Desoleum, a decaying hive held together by ancient oaths.

Today, developer Tim Huckelbery explores the process of creating Hive Desoleum and the strange peoples who inhabit it. While creating new art descriptions for The Lathe Worlds , one of the earlier Dark Heresy books, we wanted to include a hive ganger image.

Warranty & Support

Hives and the vicious gangers that inhabit them are an iconic part of Warhammer 40, , and it was natural to include them. The issue was that a firm description of a hive ganger's appearance is non-existent. There's no such thing as "typical" or "normal" in the 41st millennium, so we couldn't truly say our proposed hive ganger looked typical.

Each ganger looks different, depending on the gang she belongs to. Each hive has its own groups of hive gangers, unique to that hive, and each world has unique hives.

For us to create a hive ganger and bring her to life properly, we had a bit of work to do - we needed to build a world. The first thing we did was create a gang for our ganger to walk alongside. Drawing inspiration from films, we decided that most gangs in our new hive would belong to gang affiliations, with each affiliation featuring an iconic fighting method, weapon type, or even clothing style.

Our new gang, the Bloodlines, would be one of the Fleshcutter gangs, all obsessed with bladed weapons and ritual scarring. Talents have a fixed cost - the ones that you can take multiple times cost the same every time. Instead, their cost depends on both their "Tier" and aptitudes; their cost is the same as a skill rank one step above the talent's tier:.

You can, instead, use point download, which gives you 25 in every characteristic and then 60 discretionary to distribute, with a maximum of 40; if you distribute your points evenly, you will have exactly 31 in every characteristic. A characteristic bonus works differently for each model. If you are using point download, instead each of your bonuses adds 5 to the relevant characteristic and your penalty subtracts 5 giving you the only legal way to start with a characteristic at For both of these, your starting number is also the maximum you regenerate to - if you start with 4 Fate Points, the most you can have is 4, and if you start with 2, the most you can have is 2 Fate Points come back every session, but your maximum can come up if you encounter a mechanic for getting more mid-session.

Same with Wounds - whatever you start with is how many you can be healed up to. However, you do get a chance to start with one extra maximium Fate Point via the Emperor's Blessing; roll a d10 and if it's greater than or equal to the result designated by your homeworld you'll get the bonus. First is the homeworld for your first aptitudes, characteristic modifiers, fate points and your chance of getting an extra Fate Point from a successful Emperor's Blessing roll , and homeworld bonus.

The homeworld bonuses are a mix of old standbys from the previous edition and some new ones. Next, you pick your background to determine starting skills, talents, equipment, background bonus, and background aptitude. Background bonuses are mostly new stuff. Background choices are:. The last level of character creation is your "Role", which determines the last of your aptitudes along with a talent and role bonus.

Most of the role bonuses are geared around added bonuses for use of fate points in game, with the three exceptions being Mystic, Penitent, and Desperado. All of them come with 5 additional aptitudes and 1 additional talent. Most roles have at least one aptitude they either shouldn't have but do or should have but don't in order to satisfy their own description; however, the right homeworld or background choice can compensate for it.

Role choices are:. Elite Advances are special bonuses that can make your character absurdly powerful, but each one either has steep requirements to actually acquire or comes with a bunch of undesirable effects to go with it. In any case, they all open up extra talents that only characters with those advances can use. Crucially, nobody takes as much damage as you might assume at first glance. Although the listed damage of weapons seems high compared to a character's total wounds, your toughness bonus and armour points both considerably reduce incoming damage.

A starting Warrior ignores between points of damage from every attack, and that's assuming he's standing in the open like a gormless idiot. On top of this, one of the most commonly forgotten aspects of the Dark Heresy combat system is that everyone gets one Reaction per round, which can among other things be spent at any time to attempt to dodge or parry an attack, completely negating it. Although the odds of success aren't always fantastic, it's better to try and dodge that shot or parry that axe than sit there and take it!

Equipment selection is also very important. Although badass characters can indeed be very dangerous even with poor gear, even a low-rank inexperienced character can dramatically improve their combat effectiveness by making prudent choices when it comes to their loadout. If an acolyte cell plans together and chooses their equipment to complement each other, they can make themselves very deadly as a team.

For a start, a set of Flak Armour is inexpensive, commonly available, comfortably wearable by all but the most unusually weedy characters, and dramatically improves your resilience to incoming fire. Any cell of acolytes that expects serious combat should be able to at least equip all its members with a set of Guard Flak, if it can't afford anything better.

When it comes to weapons, anyone can and should carry a few grenades if at all possible. Even for a character with low ballistic skill, all you need to do is land them reasonably close to whoever you're trying to hit.

Depending on the precise situation, you might even be able to get away with dropping them on unsuspecting opponents from above or letting them roll down slopes to your foes, and they have the potential to injure multiple enemies at a time. Used properly, then can help turn the tide in a battle where you find yourself outnumbered. The cell's primary firearms should be chosen to work well together.

Weapons that can fire fully-automatic and weapons that have the Accurate quality are generally your best choices. A good hit with a full-auto burst can do serious damage to enemies, but by far their most important aspect is the ability to lay down Suppressive Fire.

Crucially, even if you have terrible ballistic skill and no training with the weapon you're using, your ability to suppress enemies is completely unhindered. Your burst of fire almost certainly won't hit anything, but the difficulty of the test your foes must make to resist being pinned is unchanged regardless of how well you can aim. This can give less combat-oriented careers, such as the Adept, an important role to play when it comes to a fight, where they might otherwise have been reduced to hiding behind something heavy and occasionally plinking away with some crappy pistol.

High BS characters can be quite dangerous with fully automatic weapons, but should give serious consideration to using Accurate single-shot weapons, especially if they've picked up the Talents for making Called Shots at reduced penalty. Not only does an Accurate weapon grant an additional bonus to your chances to hit if you take the time to aim it, it can do extra dice of damage on a good shot - unlike a full-auto attack, this is a single hit that does more damage rather than multiple hits that are each individually subject to reduction by the target's toughness and armour.

This makes Accurate weapons great at punching through the damage reduction of particularly tough enemies, particularly if combined with the Called Shot to aim for a part of the target that is less well armoured or isn't in cover properly. Combine these two classes of weapon within your group, and you'll have some acolytes that lay down suppressive fire and force enemies into cover and some who can take accurate potshots at the suppressed enemies to take them down with little fear of receiving effective return fire.

Any foe who manages to find cover sufficient to shield him from all shots can probably be reached with a well-placed grenade. Another good investment is Flame weapons: Your average flame weapon can hit multiple enemies automatically and deal enough armour-ignoring if only someone could invent ceramite armor Another often-forgotten aspect of Flame weapons is the fact that when set on fire, enemies must take WP tests to act even before getting a chance to turn the flames off.

As most enemies and even daemons! Flamers are often almost impossible to dodge the reaction, not the AG roll that replaces a Flamer's to-hit roll if in the right conditions, as the target must have enough AG bonus to move out of the entire flamed area in a single move action: There's a reason why the Ordo Hereticus favours a fiery death for Heretics A good rule of thumb for any firefight is that if you're not in cover, all you should be doing is trying to change this state of affairs.

Even if you're a tough guy in decent armour, the small amounts of damage that come through will add up if you're under fire by a lot of enemies.

Take cover as quickly as you can whenever you can, and you drastically increase your odds of survival. Just as importantly, you must not be afraid of running away! The feeling that the group has to defeat every encounter that comes their way leads to many deaths. Sometimes, retreating in order to fight again some other day, hopefully better prepared, is the best option. If the fight isn't going your way - you're getting surrounded, taking too many injuries, or running out of munitions - make a break for it.

A cell of acolytes is at its most dangerous if it can prepare the area of the fight beforehand. Your role doesn't always have to be offensive, kicking in the cultists' door and firing wildly, hoping for the best; if you can figure out some way to lure your enemies to a carefully prepared killing zone for example, your cell might pose as black market merchants with whom your enemies try to trade for supplies in order to bring them out of hiding , you hold a significant advantage.

Heavy cover can be prepared in advance, with machine-gunners ready in hiding to cut down unsuspecting foes; scenery where enemies are likely to try and take cover once the fight begins can be rigged with booby traps or remote-detonator explosives. You can also position your group to surround the enemy and possibly attack from above, making it very difficult for them to find effective cover in the first place.

Note that this kind of thing is easier to achieve with proper information-gathering and a high Subtlety rating, so make an effort! Unless your GM is a complete dick, it'll always pay off. For psykers, you have ridiculously high chances of your brain exploding.

Only cast if you need to, and think carefully what sort of mind bullets you'll throw. Remember that the Inquisition kills every civilian who witnesses psychic phenomena! In conclusion, equipment and cohesive tactics are what make or break an acolyte cell in a serious firefight. Although having experience, high skills and plenty of talents helps, a lack of these is more than made up for by pimped out gear and a good plan.

If you have both, your cell can become a force to fear even for very well trained and equipped enemies. Upon getting most of the way up, the Arbites slips arse over head on loose scree and goes tumbling down, taking the Scum with him in the process in a manner which would please the chaos gods with its twisted irony Both him and the Scum are really busted up in a tangled mess of broken bones, skulls and dirt at the bottom of the hill.

The well-intentioned but stupid Psyker decides to save the day by announcing that he'll fix them up, and before Angry Nun can finish screaming out "no don't the veil is weak here! Horror sets Psyker on fire and sets off in pursuit Angry Nun hauls out 10G sawn-off and holy plasms of banishing, begins chasing the Horror bold and foolish! Psyker burns a bit but is still mostly functional at running Tech Priest snaps a shot off at the horror with las-carbine, doesn't do very much, resumes hiding Desperado: Horror lands a good old fire-bolt to the back of the Psyker and sets the truck on fire Angry Nun scores a good hit with some banishing water and hurts the Horror a bit Psyker is in a fair bit of pain, still on fire and running around going "Ow!

Oh God-Emprah it burns! Horror blows the foot off the Psyker with a bolt Angry Nun is busting up the Horror pretty good, but a bad roll on the dice means a lot less damage than hoped even after a re-roll on a fate point Psyker, still on fire, minus foot and now crawling in agony Tech Priest manages to get the truck fire under control Desperado rolls around on fire Arbites wakes up, shrieks a bit and passes out again.

Horror lands another bolt Angry Nun snaps off some serious pain on the Horror, he's looking very wobbly now Psyker detonates in a shower of meat, shrapnel, armour and exploding munitions; the area is now safe, except for the Horror Tech Priest gets injured by chunks of Psyker Desperado gets injured by chunks of Psyker, continues burning Arbites: Angry Nun vs Horror at the same initiative Angry Nun pulls trigger on sawn-off shotgun Horror lets loose with a Psychic Scream Angry Nun falls down on 5pts of Fatigue, Horror explodes in shower of gibs and returns whence it came Psyker rains down on the landscape in burning chunks Tech Priest puts the Scum out Desperado is much happier now that he's not on fire anymore Arbites: Keep in mind that this example features a lesser Daemon.

If this were a greater Daemon, our heroes wouldn't have survived past the second round. Jump to: