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PROZAC NATION BOOK

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PROZAC NATION Young and Depressed in America. want to be the author of a book in which the phrase "I became rambunctious with tears". download Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America - A Memoir New by Elizabeth Wurtzel (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Everyday low. Prozac Nation [Elizabeth Wurtzel] on dancindonna.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A book that became a cultural touchstone. -- The New Yorker Elizabeth.


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Prozac Nation book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. A harrowing story of breakdowns, suicide attempts, drug therapy, a. Prozac Nation is a memoir by Elizabeth Wurtzel published in The book describes the author's experiences with atypical depression, her own character. Twenty-six-year-old Wurtzel, a former critic of popular music for New York and the New Yorker, recounts in this luridly intimate memoir the 10 years of chronic.

Smith I read this book because a psychologist told me it would convince me psychiatric drugs such as Prozac help people. After reading every word of all pages of this book, I can tell you it did not. Furthermore, the author, Elizabeth Wurtzel, did not intend for her book to convince people of anything. In a Afterword published after the original edition of the book, she says "Prozac Nation is, as far as I'm concerned, a memoir with no particular thesis or point, nothing in it championing any cause The author's detailed description of the circumstances that caused her dispair makes clear the causes were entirely events in her life, not biological abnormality such as the mythical, elusive "chemical imbalance" on which many people foolishly blame their so-called depression.

There isn't some blood test, akin to those for mononucleosis or HIV, that you can take to find a mental imbalance" p. She also acknowledges that when her life went well, her despondency or so-called depression lifted without any help from psychiatric drugs or other supposed psychiatric therapy: "Every so often there's a reprieve, like when Nathan and I first fell in love, or when I first started writing for The New Yorker" p.

Speaking of her first sexual expereince when she was only 12 years old she says, "I do nothing at all but sit there and take in the sensation because it feels good, it is the only thing that has felt nice to me at all in so many months, maybe even years. I have never had a feeling quite like this before And I can't imagine what I've done to deserve anything so nice.

Rambunctious With Tears - The New York Times

And I feel blessed. I feel that if God has given me this capacity for pleasure, then there must be hope. This physical contact brings me such happiness that I want to tell everybody I know about it From the title of the book one might assume she ends her story saying her despondency or so-called depression was miraculously cured by Prozac. However, that really isn't what her story reveals.

Although she does claim that "Prozac was the miracle that saved my life and jump-started me out of a full-time state of depression" p. Like a true believer, convinced by psychiatry's propaganda and the drug companies' advertisements claiming benefit for those who take psychiatric drugs, she says "I filled my prescritions, and believed that was enough.

She found out otherwise: She says that because she was no longer taking Mellaril, "I felt like hell in the beginning of my Prozac days" p.

Rambunctious With Tears

She says, "Yes, I think, any minute now The truth will set me free, and all that. Of course, it never happens. Years of therapy, and it never happens.

Psychotrotropic drugs, and it never happens" p. Her only ever suicide attempt was shortly after she started taking Prozac.

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She says, "The secret I sometimes think that only I know is that Prozac really isn't that great" p. She says that she's been taking Prozac "since the F.

She says "lithium She also says: "But then, as I found myself ruining relationships, alienating employers and other people I worked with, and falling all too frequently into depressive blackouts that would go on for days and would feel as desolate and unyielding as the black wave scares I'd spend much of my pre-Prozac life running from, I realized I needed therapy" p. In other words, Prozac - and lithium - weren't the answer after all. In summary: When Elizabeth Wurtzel's life went well, she was happy.

As Sigmund Freud said, two of the most important aspects of anyone's life are love and work. Wurtzel was a toddler when her parents separated.

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Raised by her mother, she was precocious at pain, slicing up her legs with a razor blade by the time she was 11 years old. Wurtzel makes her emotional life sound unceasingly tumultuous: She describes an adolescence spent stoned, drunk and miserable, all because of a depression she compares to a "fog" that was "like a cage without a key.

Running parallel to Ms.

Nation book prozac

Wurtzel's litany of woe, however, is a series of triumphs that serve to remind us that no matter how low the author felt, she was still more successful than many of us.

She got good grades at Harvard, and while still in college was a valued reporter for The Dallas Morning News. She won a Rolling Stone college journalism award, and she still has a slew of friends always ready to hose her down and console her.

It would be possible to have more sympathy for Ms.

Book prozac nation

Wurtzel if she weren't so exasperatingly sympathetic to herself. A Sylvia Plath with the ego of Madonna, she quotes from her "bad, depressing, adolescent poetry," compares herself favorably to Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes, and declares "the year of broken glass and broken girls, of broken me.

Prozac Nation

My gifts are unspecific. I am an artist manque. Peter D.

Kramer's best-selling book, "Listening to Prozac," detailed many of the scientific and social reasons why America may indeed be turning into a Prozac nation.